(Attention: Spoilers Ahead!)

In Fargo, an unpredictable and manipulative out-of-towner named Lorne Malvo (Billy Bob Thornton) incites a string of murders in small-town Minnesota. Though thematically, tonally, and aesthetically based on the critically acclaimed 1996 Coen brothers’ film of the same name – fear not, the series preserves the film’s beloved dark humor and “you betcha”s – the Emmy-nominated FX mini-series introduces entirely new characters and plot. Many of these characters are unexpectedly layered, defying tropes of the idiot detective and the ruthless killer, while some minor characters fit comfortably in well-known molds. It is a credit to the expert writing and acting that even these characters – including Glenn Howerton’s artificially bronzed and tragically naïve personal trainer – are vibrant.

Read on for more as Elizabeth Mutter leads a walkthrough and discussion of Fargo’s infiltrating darkness and skillful boiling points.
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(Attention: Spoilers Ahead!)

In Fargo, an unpredictable and manipulative out-of-towner named Lorne Malvo (Billy Bob Thornton) incites a string of murders in small-town Minnesota. Though thematically, tonally, and aesthetically based on the critically acclaimed 1996 Coen brothers’ film of the same name – fear not, the series preserves the film’s beloved dark humor and “you betcha”s – the Emmy-nominated FX mini-series introduces entirely new characters and plot. Many of these characters are unexpectedly layered, defying tropes of the idiot detective and the ruthless killer, while some minor characters fit comfortably in well-known molds. It is a credit to the expert writing and acting that even these characters – including Glenn Howerton’s artificially bronzed and tragically naïve personal trainer – are vibrant.

Read on for more as Elizabeth Mutter leads a walkthrough and discussion of Fargo’s infiltrating darkness and skillful boiling points.

   

Tags: #Fargo #FX #The Coen brothers #Martin Freeman #Billy Bob Thornton #features #Elizabeth Mutter


 

Russia is Restless: An Official Brooklyn Book Festival Event

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Join restlessbooks for their brooklynbookfestival event! And 

   

Tags: #Restless Books #BKBF14 #the brooklyn book festival #events #Brooklyn #New York City


 

Joseph O’Neill’s Bleak and Funny Novel About the “Abracadabrapolis” of Dubai

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Jennifer Acker reviews THE DOG for Slate—on brilliant style and unrelenting density.

   

Tags: #The Dog #Joseph O'Neill #Slate #Slate.com #Jennifer Acker #reviews #Dubai


 

1) The most striking physical features of this city/town are… 
Used to be the capitol, now the tower cranes, their booms like the economy here.
2) The stereotype of the people who live here and what this stereotype misses…
White tattooed scenesters. The stereotype doesn’t miss.
3) Historical context in broad strokes and the moments in which you feel this history…
A way nutz historical time now. My oldest son, a master’s in public policy, spent years taking shit survival jobs. He finally found a gig—in Kabul, Afghanistan, for a NATO contractor.
4) Local/regional vocabulary or food? 
Gucci cool fusions of Asian Texan Mexican and hippie except for the pork
5) Local politics and debates frequently seem to center on . .. 
A realized 60s dream, now gray-haired post hippie, very polite and well-organized.

In our newest “Ask a Local” column, Dagoberto Gilb shows us around Austin, TX, “a realized sixties dream” where “the stereotype doesn’t miss.”  
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1) The most striking physical features of this city/town are… 

Used to be the capitol, now the tower cranes, their booms like the economy here.


2) The stereotype of the people who live here and what this stereotype misses…

White tattooed scenesters. The stereotype doesn’t miss.


3) Historical context in broad strokes and the moments in which you feel this history…

A way nutz historical time now. My oldest son, a master’s in public policy, spent years taking shit survival jobs. He finally found a gig—in Kabul, Afghanistan, for a NATO contractor.


4) Local/regional vocabulary or food? 

Gucci cool fusions of Asian Texan Mexican and hippie except for the pork


5) Local politics and debates frequently seem to center on . .. 

A realized 60s dream, now gray-haired post hippie, very polite and well-organized.

In our newest “Ask a Local” column, Dagoberto Gilb shows us around Austin, TX, “a realized sixties dream” where “the stereotype doesn’t miss.”  

   

Tags: #Dagoberto Gilb #Austin #Texas #Ask a Local #hippies


 

Casey delivered pharmaceuticals, body parts, and body fluids to nursing homes and medical facilities. He drove the graveyard shift. One night, for no good reason, I decided to tag along.
We started at 7pm and snaked the surface roads, passing local Memphis landmarks like the humongous lawn Buddha and the trapezoid house, both on Mendenhall in the Hickory Hill neighborhood. On I-40, we passed the World’s Tallest Crosses of the Calvary, located on the lawn of the Bellevue Baptist Church. After that, the landmarks disappeared. It grew dark, except for the dashboard. We headed toward Jackson, Tennessee, with a car full of drugs and the sense—at least on my part—that we were on a great adventure.

Read on as Betsy Taylor sends us a dispatch from “The Graveyard Shift,” driving a truck full of body parts through West Tennessee.
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Casey delivered pharmaceuticals, body parts, and body fluids to nursing homes and medical facilities. He drove the graveyard shift. One night, for no good reason, I decided to tag along.


We started at 7pm and snaked the surface roads, passing local Memphis landmarks like the humongous lawn Buddha and the trapezoid house, both on Mendenhall in the Hickory Hill neighborhood. On I-40, we passed the World’s Tallest Crosses of the Calvary, located on the lawn of the Bellevue Baptist Church. After that, the landmarks disappeared. It grew dark, except for the dashboard. We headed toward Jackson, Tennessee, with a car full of drugs and the sense—at least on my part—that we were on a great adventure.

Read on as Betsy Taylor sends us a dispatch from “The Graveyard Shift,” driving a truck full of body parts through West Tennessee.

   

Tags: #Tennessee #trucking #nursing homes #creative nonfiction #Betsy Taylor #dispatches


 
clmporg:

books:

Save the date! Spread the word! And kick off the Brooklyn Book Festival and Bookends week with Tumblr, recommendedreading, penamerican, and buzzfeedbooks!
We’ll have Karl Ove Knausgård “My Struggle” Mad Libs with kickstarter at 8, dancing with DJ sammybananas at 9, and free drinks as long as they last.
Hope to see you there!

Our struggle is coming to terms with how many days we have to live through before attending this event. But we shall prevail! And, hopefully, see you there?
 | 1,554 notes

clmporg:

books:

Save the date! Spread the word! And kick off the Brooklyn Book Festival and Bookends week with Tumblr, recommendedreading, penamerican, and buzzfeedbooks!

We’ll have Karl Ove Knausgård “My Struggle” Mad Libs with kickstarter at 8, dancing with DJ sammybananas at 9, and free drinks as long as they last.

Hope to see you there!

Our struggle is coming to terms with how many days we have to live through before attending this event. But we shall prevail! And, hopefully, see you there?

   

Tags: #events #the brooklyn book festival #bkbf14 #repost


 

“I believe New Yorkers. Whether they’ve ever questioned the dream in which they live, I wouldn’t know, because I won’t ever dare ask that question.”
– Dylan Thomas
In my first months in New York City I rode in the back of taxicabs through Central Park thinking, “When will this sink in? When will it feel like I know where I am.” I didn’t think I was dreaming – rather, I felt the whole city was dreaming with me inside of it, a poppy-field illusion, a drug trip induced by hidden valves releasing an experimental hallucinogen. The city needed to pinch itself awake, collectively, and climb out of the hollow to find out what was really going on.
“I stopped at Lexington Avenue,” wrote Joan Didion of her arrival in the city, “and bought a peach and stood on the corner eating it and knew that I had come out of the West and reached the mirage.” You arrive, you reach the mirage, and you wait for it to clear.

Read on for more of Melody Nixon on Dylan Thomas, Joan Didion, and creating/surviving the mirage of New York City.
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I believe New Yorkers. Whether they’ve ever questioned the dream in which they live, I wouldn’t know, because I wont ever dare ask that question.

– Dylan Thomas

In my first months in New York City I rode in the back of taxicabs through Central Park thinking, When will this sink in? When will it feel like I know where I am. I didn’t think I was dreaming – rather, I felt the whole city was dreaming with me inside of it, a poppy-field illusion, a drug trip induced by hidden valves releasing an experimental hallucinogen. The city needed to pinch itself awake, collectively, and climb out of the hollow to find out what was really going on.


I stopped at Lexington Avenue, wrote Joan Didion of her arrival in the city, and bought a peach and stood on the corner eating it and knew that I had come out of the West and reached the mirage. You arrive, you reach the mirage, and you wait for it to clear.

Read on for more of Melody Nixon on Dylan Thomas, Joan Didion, and creating/surviving the mirage of New York City.

   

Tags: #New York #New York City #Joan Didion #Dylan Thomas #NYC #Melody Nixon #In House


 

In August 2013, Amherst College acquired one of the most comprehensive collections of books by Native American Indian authors ever assembled by a private collector. This collection, from Pablo Eisenberg, consists of about 1,500 books that include poetry, fiction, history, philosophy, and many other works. Even texts by some of the first Native American Indian writers to be published in their lifetimes, such as Samson Occom, William Apess, and Elias Boudinot, are a part of this vast collection. The Robert Frost Library seeks to show as much as possible of the history of Native American writing and philosophy in their exhibit: The Younghee Kim-Wait Pablo Eisenberg Native American Literature Collection.
To learn more about this exhibit, I interviewed Head Archivist Michael Kelly, who was part of the team who acquired the collection, and two Native American Studies professors at Amherst College, Professors Lisa Brooks and Kiara Vigil.
Stephanie Sosa (SS): What makes this collection different from other Native American Literature collections? Michael Kelly (MK): What sets this collection apart is its focus on published works of Native authorship. These are books written, for the most part, by Indigenous people for a public audience. Sometimes these books had small print runs, limited circulation, or were even actively suppressed, but they all represent statements by Native people for an audience. We do not hold, and are not going to attempt to acquire, personal manuscripts or other items that probably best belong in tribal collections. What we are aiming for is documentation of writing that Indigenous people wanted to circulate widely. 

Read on for more about The Younghee Kim-Wait Pablo Eisenberg Native American Literature Collection.
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In August 2013, Amherst College acquired one of the most comprehensive collections of books by Native American Indian authors ever assembled by a private collector. This collection, from Pablo Eisenberg, consists of about 1,500 books that include poetry, fiction, history, philosophy, and many other works. Even texts by some of the first Native American Indian writers to be published in their lifetimes, such as Samson Occom, William Apess, and Elias Boudinot, are a part of this vast collection. The Robert Frost Library seeks to show as much as possible of the history of Native American writing and philosophy in their exhibit: The Younghee Kim-Wait Pablo Eisenberg Native American Literature Collection.

To learn more about this exhibit, I interviewed Head Archivist Michael Kelly, who was part of the team who acquired the collection, and two Native American Studies professors at Amherst College, Professors Lisa Brooks and Kiara Vigil.


Stephanie Sosa (SS): What makes this collection different from other Native American Literature collections? 

Michael Kelly (MK): What sets this collection apart is its focus on published works of Native authorship. These are books written, for the most part, by Indigenous people for a public audience. Sometimes these books had small print runs, limited circulation, or were even actively suppressed, but they all represent statements by Native people for an audience. We do not hold, and are not going to attempt to acquire, personal manuscripts or other items that probably best belong in tribal collections. What we are aiming for is documentation of writing that Indigenous people wanted to circulate widely. 

Read on for more about The Younghee Kim-Wait Pablo Eisenberg Native American Literature Collection.

   

Tags: #Native American literature #Amherst College #Native American Philosophy #Native American Studies #Samson Occom #William Apess #Elias Boudinot #Pablo Eisenberg #The Common Studio #Stephanie Sosa